Burma in Black and White – Part 1

August 3, 2014 § 6 Comments

Sunset in Bagan, Burma.

Sunset in Bagan, Burma.

This has been a busy week full of painting projects, Burma research, summer gardening, and print designs! Today, I’d like to share more images with you from our travels through Upper Burma– truly one of the most unique places I’ve ever been to.

Some photos just work better in black and white. Here is a collection of those images with accompanying descriptions. So much of the designs for the Thailand Burma Flora Fauna project have been influenced by what I saw and felt during my travels in Burma.

I appreciate all of your feedback and your reaching out to me. Thank you all so much for your continued support! 

Burma in B/W

Men driving an old diesel tractor through the center of Nyaung Shwe, on Inle Lake. It is not uncommon to see vehicles from another era still in use everyday in Burma.

Men driving an old diesel tractor through the center of Nyaung Shwe, on Inle Lake. It is not uncommon to see vehicles from another era still in everyday use in Burma.

Dusk view of Mandalay from Mandalay Hill. You can see the shining Irrawaddy River on the horizon. The river is the main artery that runs through Burma all the way to the Andaman sea.

Dusk view of Mandalay from Mandalay Hill. You can see the Irrawaddy River shining on the horizon. It’s the main artery that runs through Burma all the way to the Andaman sea.

Beth and I on the canal in Nyaung Shwe, on Inle Lake, Burma.

Beth and I on the canal in Nyaung Shwe, on Inle Lake, Burma.

Street snap of men on motorbikes at sunset, Mandalay.

Street snap of men on motorbikes at sunset, Mandalay.

There is a small mountain town on Mt. Popa, a forested volcano topped with a monastery, that is overrun by tribes of naughty monkeys. Our guide told us, “The monkeys here... they can be quite rude.”

There is a small mountain town on Mt. Popa, a forested volcano topped with a monastery, that is overrun by tribes of naughty monkeys. Our guide said, “The monkeys here… they can be quite rude.” I concur. Many residents walked with sticks to fend them off.

Street snap of a woman on a bicycle, Mandalay, Burma.

Street snap of a woman on a bicycle, Mandalay, Burma.

Morning on the Bagan plain-- a valley of ancient ruins in Bagan, Burma.

Morning on the Bagan plain– a valley of ancient ruins in Bagan, Burma.

Novice monks in a temple in Bagan, Burma.

Novice monks in a temple in Bagan, Burma.

Filling up at the gas station on Inle Lake. It was comprised of a kid on a wooden dock with a bucket of gas and a hose.

Filling up at the gas station on Inle Lake, which was comprised of a young boy on a wooden dock with a bucket of gas and a hose. Why not?

Mandalay in the morning from the Smart Hotel.

View of Mandalay in the morning from the Smart Hotel.

In a golden temple in Mandalay, a young girl is wearing thanaka, a yellow-white-gold colored cream that many Burmese folks wear on their face. Thanaka is part sun screen and part cosmetic product, and is made from the ground bark, wood, or roots of various local trees.

In a golden temple in Mandalay, a young girl is wearing thanaka, a yellow-white-gold colored cream that many Burmese folks wear on their faces. Thanaka is part sun screen and part cosmetic product. It is made from the ground bark, wood, or roots of various trees.

Street snap of women hanging out at the morning market in a small village on Inle Lake.

Some ladies hanging out and chatting at the morning market in a small village on Inle Lake. Note: each of them is wearing thanaka on their cheeks.

Thank you all so much for your continued interest and support of the Thailand Burma Flora Fauna project!

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§ 6 Responses to Burma in Black and White – Part 1

  • i love the sunset in b/w because of the tones, but i miss the colour on the others. also i think you need to rant about portland on here soon. i’m looking forward to it

    • Mike Schultz Paintings says:

      I totally understand about missing the colors! I do too. Though, these are images where I really liked the content, but the colors and tones weren’t working as color images- like they were too bleached out, etc. Also, sometimes you see other things you would never have noticed when and image is in black and white. A couple of these I feel like if you didn’t know that they are current, you may not be able to guess the year they were taken. And for some strange reason I feel like you can get away with blurry bw photographs in a way you can’t with color. Mysteries!

      Portland is bloody expensive and while it is safer now and looks nicer it has greatly changed for the worse! So so many hipper-than-thou people that just weren’t here / visible a decade ago. My house is a nice place to be though. Come visit!

  • This is beautiful. Just beautiful impressions of this place. What a documentary. What an experience. Great photos. Those monkeys would worry me. That doorway with the young monks looks like a lotus blossom opening. Thanks for sharing these.

    • Mike Schultz Paintings says:

      Thank you so much for you kind comment, Stephen. The doorway may very well be a lotus, as I know the architecture of those temples is all symbolic. And yes, the monkeys worried me. The can be pretty pesky, stealing things out of your hands and biting, and I can’t say that there are any hospitals around there. Anyway, I appreciate your thoughts!

  • jackbaumgartner says:

    Mikey, I am sorry it took me a while to comment on this post. The photographs are truly lovely. I can always see you so clearly in context on the other end of the camera, more than I do with anyone else, when I look at your pictures. I wonder why that is? It is almost like seeing 360 degrees. Thank you for sharing them with us. I love the image of the young man filling the boat with fuel.

    • Mike Schultz Paintings says:

      That’s funny, because I thought you would like the one of the boat fueling station. There are some more images I have of artisans that I need to share with you too.

      I think I do the same thing with your photographs, my friend. It’s easy to imagine you on the other side of your camera taking a close up of perfectly focused wood shavings in beautiful light in your shop. Helps me to place you there and makes it easier to understand your life and daily routine. It’s one of the wonders of the internet to be able to really share our lives in this way. Thanks again for your comment on here- always so nice to hear from you on whatever format.

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